Follow us on:

Twitter YouTube

Contact us:

Contact us

Email updates:

Email updates?

Tools:

Send to
friends:

Send to friends

 

Print:

Print

 

Text size:

Text Size - Small Text Size - Normal Text Size - Large

The project


National Grid is helping to develop solutions to reduce the carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from power stations and industrial plants in the Yorkshire and Humber region.

A solution being explored is carbon capture, transportation and storage (CCS) technology – capturing carbon dioxide emissions and transporting them to be stored permanently beneath the seabed in natural porous rock formations or depleted oil and gas fields.

The Yorkshire and Humber CCS Cross-County Pipeline project would involve the construction of a cross-country pipeline and a sub-sea pipeline to transport carbon dioxide from fossil fuel power stations and industrial plants in the region to a permanent geological storage site beneath the North Sea.          

The onshore pipeline would be 75km long and would use the same sort of technology as the national high-pressure gas pipeline network, owned and operated by National Grid.

It would be up to 24" (about 600mm) in diameter and buried at least 1.2 meters below the ground.  The carbon dioxide would be transported in liquid form at a pressure of 150barg.

The sub-sea pipeline would be the same size and on the seabed.  Offshore, the carbon dioxide would be transported at a pressure of up to 200barg to a geological storage site beneath the North Sea.  

The pipeline would have the capacity to transport up to 17 million tonnes of carbon dioxide every year. The long-term aspiration is for the pipeline to form the foundation of a regional CCS network, potentially capturing tens of millions of tonnes of carbon dioxide every year.

3D animation

The video below provides more detail on the project.

Video requirements

The default format for videos on our site is Flash, which requires the free Adobe Flash Player. You will also need a Javascript enabled browser.

To download the Adobe Flash Player, please click here.